Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Gudetama at Eggs 'n Things

By
October 3rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A Gudetama loco moco with bacon blanket is part of a three item Gudetama "Sleepy" menu available at Eggs 'n Things through Oct. 28. Gudetama's face is created with edible gel paper.

Two Gudetama set menus are available as part of a Sanrio and Eggs 'n Things collaboration benefit for the Japan Society's Kumamoto Relief Fund for victims of the April earthquakes in Japan.

The offer has Gudetama doing good, in spite of his detached, disengaged nature.

For those who have yet to discover Gudetama, he is Sanrio's popular "lazy egg," who prefers the warmth and security of his bacon blanket, or to hide in his shell, rather than explore his horizons and engage with society. Here's a video:

Gudetama is stenciled in cocoa atop whipped cream and hot chocolate.

Two set menus are available at Eggs 'n Things three locations:
Outside Ala Moana Center at 451 Piikoi St.
Waikiki at 343 Saratoga Road
Waikiki Beach Eggspress at 2464 Kalakaua Ave.

Gudetama is stenciled in lemon frosting onto dessert pancakes at Eggs 'n Things on a promotional menu through Oct. 28.

The $15 Gudetama "Sleepy" menu available from noon to closing features a loco moco with Gudetama egg and bacon blanket, Gudetama hot chocolate with whipped cream, and dessert of Gudetama pancake with lemon frosting, whipped cream, strawberries and chocolate sauce.

The $16 Gudetama "Lazy" menu available from 4 p.m. to closing features a burger with Gudetama egg and french fries, Gudetama iced coffee (or iced cappuccino) with whipped cream, and the Gudetama pancake dessert.

A portion of the sales price will go to the relief fund. For more information about the fundraising effort, visit japansociety.org/earthquake.

Two good things together.

Our photographer Cindy Ellen Russell posed with a Gudetama display piece at the Eggs 'n Things Ala Moana location.

Unwilling to walk, the lazy egg Gudetama was rolled into a media event Sept. 29 at Eggs 'n Things Ala Moana.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Short video: Inside Sun Noodle

By
August 31st, 2016



Here's a small peek inside the Sun Noodle factory in Honolulu, where the humble process of mixing flour, water, eggs and other ingredients to make noodles and dumpling wrappers feeds people hungry for ramen, saimin, gyoza, won tons, and more.

It coincides with my story in the paper today, about how a tiny one-man operation that started in 1981 has grown to become a kama'aina operation at the forefront of a global ramen revolution due to its philosophy of providing artisinal noodles to restaurants' specifications and push for creativity.

Some of that creativity starts with Sun Noodle's New Jersey-based Ramen Lab, that welcomes both consumers and restaurant professionals to learn more about ramen, and helps chefs develop recipes for their shops.

Moving beyond traditional Japanese ramen, they've supported regional incarnations ranging from New York-style Italian ramen, Texas brisket tsukemen in Austin, Texas, and gator ramen in Gainesville, Fla.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Larb sticky rice burger pops up

By
February 18th, 2016



COURTESY WANG CHUNG'S

Homestyle Meals larb sticky rice burger was served up during a popup at Wang Chung's in Waikiki.

Leave it to Wang Chung's owner Danny Chang to come up with another attention-grabbing invitation to his popup with Homestyle Meals Ashley Thaira. With her larb sticky rice burger as the star attraction, his headline read: "Me Larb You Long Time," in luring the hungry to sample a $12 Lao-themed family dinner that took place Feb. 11.

It's one of many homey, family style popups he has planned for his fun pau hana pupu and karaoke bar, because he's a natural-born social director who just loves bringing all kinds of people together.

As for this particular event, Chung, our hi-energy host with the most, explained that he was celebrating the Chinese New Year in Chinatown when he came upon Thaira's booth serving "the most delicious home-style Lao cooking. They had unique dishes that you don't find here in Hawaii such as Nam Khao Tod (Lao crispy rice ball salad) and this amazing larb sticky rice burger."

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Look mom, no wheat! Gluten-free rejoice! The larb sticky rice burger was the highlight of a popup at Wang Chung's.

Ashley Thaira shows her green papaya salad, also below.

larb salad

The burger is of minced pork, and the patty is dipped in a sweetened fish sauce before being layered with cucumber, cilantro and green onions between two sticky rice buns. Yummers! What's more, it's perfect for this gluten-free era.

Also on the menu was a green papaya salad, Nam Van, a dessert of fresh fruit and tapioca in coconut milk, and Sa Dok Bua, lotus tea scented with pandan leaves.

Beyond the popup, Homestyle Meals and Thaira's $8 larb sticky rice burger can be found at the Mahiku Farmers Market at Iroquis Point 3 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesdays at 5105 Iroquois Ave. She's looking for more venues in downtown Honolulu. Let's hope that happens soon and I'll keep you posted when that happens.

Wang Chung's is in the Stay boutique hotel at 2424 Koa Ave. in Waikiki, behind the Hyatt Regency Waikiki. Open 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. daily. Call (808) 921-9176.

Inside Wang Chung's.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Ugly fish in Singapore's Chinatown

By
November 1st, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comWhen in doubt traveling in a foreign city, follow the locals. In Singapore's Chinatown, a lot of parties were centered around this fish dish. Watch the video at the bottom to see the fish cooking over fire.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

When in doubt traveling in a foreign city, follow the locals. In Singapore's Chinatown, a lot of parties were centered around this fish dish. Watch the video below to see the fish cooking over fire.

Day two in Singapore saw us heading to Chinatown where we hoped to find the nation's famous chili crab. Possibly because of demand, hawker stalls were out. But, in People's Park food court, we saw a wondrous sight: people walking by with large pans carrying Chong Qing grilled fish.

It's a variation of a hot pot dish that originated in Chong Qing, China, part of Sichuan province, which explains its spicy character and use of the tongue-numbing Sichuan peppercorn. Here though, the sauce was so balanced I didn't mind the peppercorns at all.

The fish—in this case grouper—is not really grilled, but deep-fried; layered over bean sprouts, sliced onions and other veggies; doused with the soy-sesame-black bean-ginger-spice sauce; then topped with cilantro and peanuts. It is delicious!

It wasn't hard to spot locals sitting down for a lunch of Chong Qing grilled fish, one of those dishes you see and know you must try.

It wasn't hard to spot locals sitting down for a lunch of Chong Qing grilled fish, one of those dishes you see and know you must try.

The grouper doesn't look much more attractive when it's alive. I took this photo at my hotel, the Marina Bay Sands.

The grouper doesn't look much more attractive when it's alive. I took this photo at my hotel, the Marina Bay Sands.

Another Chinatown treasure is bak kwa, which translates as "fragrant jerky." Singapore's sweet, tender and juicy pork jerky sells for about SG$25 per pound, or about $18.50 in U.S. dollars, at outlets like Bee Cheng Hiang, where customers can sample different varieties.

Fresh fruit is also sliced, wrapped and sold in healthful single-serve to-go style. While there I also tried bingtanghulu, or candied Hawthorn berries, for the first time. The inch-and-a-half berries are stacked on skewers and not something I would try if I just saw it on the street because I'm more attracted to savory bites than sweets. But, I was with Sean Morris who recognized them and liked them. We certainly don't have such a thing in Hawaii, so I tried it and liked the crunchy, crackly sweetness. If you happen to go and try them, watch out for the large seeds.

Singapore's Chinatown is beautiful. The Majestic theater on  Eu Tong Sen Street had a long history, initially built as a Cantonese opera house in 1928, converted into a theater by the Shaw Brothers in 1938, taken over by the Japanese during World War II for the screening of propaganda films, then converted back into a Chinese film theater until it closed in 1998. In 2003, it reopened as a three-story shopping complex. It is now closed.

Singapore's Chinatown is beautiful. The Majestic theater on Eu Tong Sen Street had a long history, initially built as a Cantonese opera house in 1928, converted into a theater by the Shaw Brothers in 1938, taken over by the Japanese during World War II for the screening of propaganda films, then converted back into a Chinese film theater until it closed in 1998. In 2003, it reopened as a three-story shopping complex. It is now closed.

I love the colonial architecture of the Chinatown and that they have the pride to keep the buildings beautifully painted.

I love the colonial architecture of the Chinatown and that they have the pride to keep the buildings beautifully painted.

An overpass allows you to avoid traffic below, although Singapore is one international destination where drivers tend to be cautious because laws there can be Draconian. That's what makes it so safe for travelers, unless you bring in drugs. If caught, you will likely be executed.

An overpass allows you to avoid traffic below, although Singapore is one international destination where drivers tend to be cautious because laws there can be Draconian. That's what makes it so safe for travelers, unless you bring in drugs. If caught, you will likely be executed.

Fresh fruit beautifully sliced and packaged in single-serve to-go portions.

Fresh fruit beautifully sliced and packaged in single-serve to-go portions.

Singapore's Chinatown is also known for its bak kwa, or sweet grilled pork jerky, this batch from Bee Chang Hiang. Alas, I tried to bring $40 worth of jerky home and was honest and listed it on my Customs form. And they confiscated it! So mad! Now my friends and family won't know how sweet and juicy and tender it is unless they travel to Singapore themselves. If I thought it would be taken away, I would have saved myself the trip of going back to Chinatown to pick it up fresh before my flight. They should at least reimburse us if they're going to steal our food! It's not like it's poisonous. I already ate it on the street!

Singapore's Chinatown is also known for its bak kwa, or sweet grilled pork jerky, this batch from Bee Chang Hiang. Alas, I tried to bring $40 worth of jerky home and was honest and listed it on my Customs form. And they confiscated it! So mad! Now my friends and family won't know how sweet and juicy and tender it is unless they travel to Singapore themselves. If I thought it would be taken away, I would have saved myself the trip of going back to Chinatown to pick it up fresh before my flight. Customs should at least reimburse us if they're going to steal our food! It's not like it's poisonous. I already ate it on the street!

Singapore's Chinatown is so clean compared to our own. In spite of the number of seafood dishes being offered, there were no fishy odors, no sight of fish guts lying around or puddles of fish water.

In fact, everywhere we went was clean, without a scrap of paper or cigarette butt on the ground. It just goes to show you what can be done if everyone takes pride in their city and makes the effort.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Moco Monday at Highway Inn

By
October 13th, 2015



An ahi tartare and avocado sushi-style loco moco was recently introduced during Highway Inn's Moco Monday.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

An ahi tartare and avocado sushi-style loco moco was recently introduced during Highway Inn's Moco Monday.

There was a time when the smoked meat Smokin’ Moco was the be-all-end-all of loco mocos at Highway Inn. Well, now that the restaurant has launched weekly Moco Mondays at Kaka'ako, chef Mike Kealoha has a lot of work trying to top himself each week in testing the possibilities for transforming the beloved island combo of rice, hamburger patty and gravy topped with eggs over easy.

The basic hamburger patty loco moco ($11.25 regular or $7.85 mini), and the Smokin’ Moco ($12.50, or $8.75 mini) have been staples for years, but man cannot live on the same loco moco day in and day out, so Moco Monday was born, and you never know what you'll get from week to week. To stay up to date, follow the restaurant's Facebook page.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comThe Highway Inn Hawaiian loco moco is a high-rise plate lunch, the rice topped with full size laulau, egg and lomi salmon, surrounded by a pool of beef stew.

The Highway Inn Hawaiian loco moco is a high-rise plate lunch, the rice topped with full size laulau, egg and lomi salmon, surrounded by a pool of beef stew.

Recent experiments included a truffled ahi tartar sushi-style moco ($16.25); “I Wanna Wana Moco” ($17.95), topped with sea urchin and thin strips of nori to mimic the wana’s spines; and “Highway Inn Hawaiian Plate” loco moco ($15.95) that I hope will find a permanent spot on the menu. It has all the weightiness of a Hawaiian plate, the rice surrounded with beef stew, topped with a full size pork laulau and over-easy egg garnished with lomi salmon. The presentation may be different, but it all adds up to happiness in your opu.

While in Kakaako, you’re welcome to check out the lau lau-making process that takes place 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. See the video below.

The Highway Inn Smokin' Moco with a centerpiece of lychee-wood smoked meat.

The Highway Inn Smokin' Moco with a centerpiece of lychee-wood smoked meat.

The "I Wanna Wana" moco, with nori strips to mimic the sea urchin's spines.

The "I Wanna Wana" moco, with nori strips to mimic the sea urchin's spines.

I put a Moco Monday visit with Real Jobs' Steve Yeti on Periscope, which had visitors tuning in from all over the world, and one commenting, "Hawaii is so random." Yes, we can be very different from the rest of the nation but I think that's a good thing. All I can say is yetis have to eat too. And they like loco mocos! A memorable experience!

I put a Moco Monday visit with Real Jobs' Steve Yeti on Periscope, which had visitors tuning in from all over the world, and one commenting, "Hawaii is so random." Yes, we can be very different from the rest of the nation but I think that's a good thing. All I can say is yetis have to eat too. And they like loco mocos!

Highway Inn Kakaako is at 680 Ala Moana Blvd. Call (808) 954-4955.

Also, if you’re in Kalihi, check out the new Bishop Museum Cafe by Highway Inn, open to museum visitors and the public from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. The museum is at 1525 Bernice St. You can check out the menu ahead of time at myhighwayinn.com.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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