Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Matsumoto Shave Ice turns 65

By
August 24th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A visitor is mesmerized by the glory of Matsumoto Shave Ice.

Matsumoto Shave Ice will be celebrating 65 years of serving Hawaii at Hale‘iwa Store Lots, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 27. The event will feature shave ice specials and an opportunity to purchase exclusive Matsumoto Shave Ice T-shirts commemorating the occasion.

In honor of its 65th year of business, Matsumoto Shave Ice will be offering one flavor shave ice for 65 cents, from 9 a.m. until noon. There will also be 500 special print anniversary T-shirts available for purchase at $6.50 per shirt while supplies last. Guest artist DJ Shift will provide entertainment from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., followed by Mike Izon from 2 to 4 p.m.

“Matsumoto Shave Ice is an iconic North Shore destination and we are thrilled to celebrate their 65th Anniversary,” said Ryan Ng, Senior Asset Manager for landlord Kamehameha Schools. “Their 65 years of being in operations is a true testament to the spirit of Hawaii’s homegrown business.”

Selling rainbows and happiness in a bowl.

Established in 1951 by Mamoru Matsumoto and his wife Helen, Matsumoto Shave Ice has been familiar Haleiwa landmark for more than half a century. Matsumoto aimed to open his own business and when an opportunity to open a grocery store arose, he took it, originally taking orders and delivering goods on a bicycle, while Helen, a seamstress, managed the store. After the birth of their three children, the couple decided to expand the business to support their growing family.

Given the store’s beachy North Shore location, Matsumoto began selling shave ice made with homemade syrup. The store’s reputation grew as surfers, weekenders circling the island, and visitors from abroad, dropped in to sample the multiple flavors of Matsumoto’s Shave Ice.

The business remains in family hands, currently owned by one of Mamoru's sons, Stanley Matsumoto.

“We are very excited to be celebrating 65 years in business,” he said, in a press statement. "I am proud to be a part of the legacy that my parents started 65 years ago and I plan to continue this legacy for years to come.”

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Vote HFWF in USA Today poll

By
August 12th, 2016



PHOTO COURTESY HAWAI'I FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL

Among local chefs involved in the. Hawai'i Food & Wine Festival are co-founders Alan Wong, left, and Roy Yamaguchi, right, and between them, Mark Noguchi, Lee Anne Wong and George Mavrothalassitis. Now they're asking you to vote for the festival as best in the nation in a USA Today poll.


Sunshine. Beaches. Food and wine selections from an international roster of top chefs and sommeliers. What's not to love about the Hawai'i Food & Wine Festival?

We've always known Hawaii is epicenter of world-class culinary events and word is getting out about the festival that, since 2011, has raised $1.3 million for local culinary and agricultural programs. HFWF is in the running for a USA Today poll looking for the Best Wine Festival in the USA Today 10 Best Poll.

HFWF has a good head start, currently in 2nd place out of 20 candidates and is hoping fans will push the festival into the top spot over the next two days.

Voting is open through 5:59 a.m. Aug. 15, Hawaii time. Here's the link to vote: 10best.com/awards/travel/best-wine-festival/hawaii-food-wine-festival-honolulu.

No need to enter email or personal information. Just click on "Vote."

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Stage popup at Mari's Gardens

By
August 2nd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Following a tour of Mari's Gardens, guests at Stage restaurant's Fresh Pop-up Dinner got to try freshly harvested vegetables from the farm grounds, such as roasted beets.

When I think of Mililani, I think "suburbia." The last thing I would expect to find there is a sprawling farm. Mari's Gardens is such a hidden gem that neighbors don't even know they exist, as I learned after getting lost en route. For townies, it might as well be another world, and during a Fresh Pop-up Dinner hosted by Stage restaurant at Mari's Gardens, I did feel like I was in another world, more Napa than Hawaii.

Before dinner, we were welcome to stroll the grounds, where baby lettuces were farming and beets were ready for harvest. Because I got there a bit late, I missed the aquaponic tanks where tilapia and Chinese catfish are raised as much for food as for their contributions to the nutrient-rich water that feed the farm's organic produce.

Dinner under a canopy that kept us dry during a sudden downpour.

The dinner showcased produce from Mari's Garden beautifully, as a demonstration of what farm-to-table dining could look like at Stage restaurant, whose owner Thomas Sorensen, is considering a rooftop aquaponic system to someday fill some of the restaurant's produce needs. Sorensen, owner of the Hawaii Design Center, where Stage is housed, has already been a longtime supporter of green, sustainable initiatives, and his building utilizes many energy efficient systems to serve as examples of what customers might want to do at home to reduce their carbon footprint.

That said, he's also a businessman, and knows the "ideal" is not always practical. Calculating the number of days it takes to grow a head of Manoa lettuce, and the volume that his rooftop can contain, he estimates that every 52 days, he will have enough to last through a single lunch service. But, where there's a will there's a way, and an herb garden might be one way to make such a system work from a green, and a business, perspective.

It's something I have had to think about while trying to raise greens at home. For the amount of water I used on tomatoes—only to see birds attack them at the first sign of ripening—it was barely worth the effort. When they did survive the odds, I had enough to make salads for a couple of days, hardly life sustaining.

Baby lettuce protected from hungry insects.

Baby lettuce protected from hungry insects.

It is amazing work that Fred Lau and his family and staff do, and Stage executive chef Ron De Guzman, pastry chef Cainan Sabey and their staff also did an excellent job. I also appreciated all their effort at delivering 40 meals when it started raining heavily and they had to make multiple trips under cover of umbrella!

I also learned a little bit more about the difficulties of farming during the downpour, because I never realized how fragile a farm ecosystem can be. All I know is, you stick a seed in the ground, it grows, and weeks later, you have food. So when I suggested that the rain will be good for the plants, I was wrong. Here, soil and water pH is constantly monitored for optimal conditions. Rain can introduce too much heavy metal in the atmosphere or make water too alkaline, impeding plants' uptake of nutrients.

Fish are also susceptible to the same conditions, and as much as we often believe that nature takes care of itself, the fish are fragile creatures that require a certain balance in their environmental conditions. Think about that, because so do we. Events like this are a first step toward opening eyes toward the balance between man and nature, and how much work we have to do to prevent excess waste and pollution.

The dinner also turned out to be a post-birthday celebration for Thomas Sorensen, owner of Hawaii Design Center and its in-store restaurant, Stage. He celebrated the occasion with his wife Michele Conan Sorensen.

"Act 1" was Mari's Garden Salad, comprising the farm's Manoa lettuce and roasted baby beets, with garlic croutons and wasabi-lilikoi dressing. The salad also included smoked goat cheese from nearby Sweetland Farms. Wine pairing: Galerie Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley, Calif., 2014.

Act II comprised beef carpaccio topped with Pecorino Romano, black pepper crème fraîche, crispy garlic, baby arugula, slices of sweet onion and watercress. Wine pairing: Barrymore Pinot Grigio, Monterey County, Calif., 2013.

Act III was seared ahi, accompanied by Mari's Garden eggplant puree, caramelized Mari's Garden negi onions and chimichurri. Wine pairing: Nielson Pinot Noir, Santa Maria, Calif., 2013.

Act IV was a duck duo of roasted breast and confit leg, accompanied by Mari's Garden carrots, Brussels sprout leaves, smoked maple gel and whole grain mustard jus. Wine pairing: Hartford Court Zinfandel, Russian River Valley, Calif., 2013.

Embracing the garden theme, the finale was a "Flower Pot" dessert of crunchy chocolate "soil" covering mango ice cream and lychee sorbet, garnished with edible nasturtium, shiso and lavender, and slivers of dried mango. Pairing: Warre's Otima 10-year Tawny Port, Portugal.

Wine pairings were by Jackson Family Wines.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Chefs pop up at Avenue's

By
July 12th, 2016



PHOTO BY SEAN MORRIS

Berkley Spivey, left, and Eddie Lopez, were in the kitchen at Avenue's Bar + Eatery for a one-night only Chef's Pop-up.

The restaurant pop-up invigorated the food scene beginning around five years ago, but as some of the more successful young chefpreneurs have moved into permanent spaces, it's been a little quiet on the pop-up scene.

So Avenue's Bar + Eatery shook things up a bit with the reunion of its executive chef Robert Paik, and his fellow Vintage Cave teammates and alum, Berkley Spivey and pastry chef Eddie Lopez.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Now in between gigs while waiting for Senia to open, pastry chef Eddie Lopez shared some of the beautiful tarts he's been baking on the side, during a preview event.

Lopez said it takes him only 15 minutes to layer the apples in his caramel apple tart, down from one hour when he started making them. He sells them through social media.

Now in between gigs, Spivey and Lopez said they missed the liveliness and "what will they do next?" excitement that marked the pop-up scene, and wanted to bring back some of that energy.

They were right about bringing the excitement because there were 200 on the wait list for their July 11 Chef's Pop-up event, hoping for a last-minute cancellation.

Spivey and Lopez presented four courses featuring ingredients and recipes that showcase their skill as chefs as well as a bit of personal inspiration, based on their roots.

Spivey grew up in the South, while Lopez grew up in Chicago, mindful of his Mexican heritage, and for guests, it was a treat to discover Lopez's work beyond pastry, as he presented a complex 32-ingredient mole served with grilled tako.

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Avenue's Bar + Eatery is at 3605 Waialae Ave. Call (808) 744-7567. Next up for the eatery is Whiskey Wednesday on the 13th. Visit avenuesbarandeatery.com for more information, or see my prior blog post at: takeabite.staradvertiserblogs.com/2016/07/02/boost-your-whiskey-iq-at-avenues/

Here's what was on the menu during the pop-up:

Snacks included zucchini sable and delicious smoked celery root macaron.

The first course was Spivey's Maui Cattle Co. cured beef ribeye carpaccio with buttery squid ink crumbled brioche, micro greens, horseradish, lime and mustard seeds.

Then Lopez presented octopus with burnt onion, black mole and cilantro like a work of abstract art. I could eat a tub of that mole!

Spivey's second dish was pork with variations of cabbage, including cabbage sauce, with white beans and brown butter.

Lopez's dessert comprised butter popcorn ice cream with dehydrated chocolate mousse and peanuts.

The presentation ended with mignardises of a pineapple gummy and strawberry-thyme shortbread cookie. I loved the combination of fruit and herb.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

4th of July Four Seasons-style

By
July 6th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Glen Almazan oversaw a raw bar featuring crab claws and snow crab legs, and different kinds of poke.

All across the nation, the 4th of July is celebrated with an All-American backyard bash. In Hawaii, the beach cookout is another popular option. So the Four Seasons Oahu at Ko Olina made it a double celebration when it hosted a grand opening party for 500 with a backyard barbecue extraordinaire, complete with a view of the resortwide fireworks show at the end of the evening.

Guests were welcomed with cocktails and treated to music by Tahiti Rey while enjoying food from a raw bar, seafood paella, bone-in prime rib, roast pork, and grilled corn on the cob which my friends and I were calling magic corn after enjoying a version of it during a visit to the resort's Fish House restaurant. (This was a pared down version, so you'll just have to go to the restaurant to get the full impact of just how good it is.)

Fireworks above the palm trees.

In addition to his welcoming remarks, Jeff Stone, founder of The Resort Group behind the development of the Four Seasons property, formerly the Ihilani Resort. Looking to Maui for inspiration, he said he envisions Ko Olina as "Wailea on Oahu," as a draw for travelers, with the aim of creating another economic engine for Hawaii.

Well, they certainly started with a bang!

Biggest wok ever.

Welcoming cocktails.

A table set with bone-in prime rib and tomato and arugula salad.

Roast herbed potatoes and a view of the beachfront lawn.

More prime rib making its way to other stations across the lawn.

Paella for 500.

Grilled corn being plated for service.

I had a view of the fireworks from the adult pool deck.

PHOTO BY MELISSA CHANG

Gangsta pose at the end of the night with Sean Morris, with Four Seasons caps added to our red, white and blue outfits.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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