Archive for the ‘Desserts’ Category

Gudetama at Eggs 'n Things

October 3rd, 2016


A Gudetama loco moco with bacon blanket is part of a three item Gudetama "Sleepy" menu available at Eggs 'n Things through Oct. 28. Gudetama's face is created with edible gel paper.

Two Gudetama set menus are available as part of a Sanrio and Eggs 'n Things collaboration benefit for the Japan Society's Kumamoto Relief Fund for victims of the April earthquakes in Japan.

The offer has Gudetama doing good, in spite of his detached, disengaged nature.

For those who have yet to discover Gudetama, he is Sanrio's popular "lazy egg," who prefers the warmth and security of his bacon blanket, or to hide in his shell, rather than explore his horizons and engage with society. Here's a video:

Gudetama is stenciled in cocoa atop whipped cream and hot chocolate.

Two set menus are available at Eggs 'n Things three locations:
Outside Ala Moana Center at 451 Piikoi St.
Waikiki at 343 Saratoga Road
Waikiki Beach Eggspress at 2464 Kalakaua Ave.

Gudetama is stenciled in lemon frosting onto dessert pancakes at Eggs 'n Things on a promotional menu through Oct. 28.

The $15 Gudetama "Sleepy" menu available from noon to closing features a loco moco with Gudetama egg and bacon blanket, Gudetama hot chocolate with whipped cream, and dessert of Gudetama pancake with lemon frosting, whipped cream, strawberries and chocolate sauce.

The $16 Gudetama "Lazy" menu available from 4 p.m. to closing features a burger with Gudetama egg and french fries, Gudetama iced coffee (or iced cappuccino) with whipped cream, and the Gudetama pancake dessert.

A portion of the sales price will go to the relief fund. For more information about the fundraising effort, visit

Two good things together.

Our photographer Cindy Ellen Russell posed with a Gudetama display piece at the Eggs 'n Things Ala Moana location.

Unwilling to walk, the lazy egg Gudetama was rolled into a media event Sept. 29 at Eggs 'n Things Ala Moana.

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Cook with See Dai Doo Society

September 19th, 2016


Pork belly and Chinese taro are covered in sauce, then topped with scallion and cilantro before being steamed to make kau yuk.

Kau yuk, ip jai, an East-West stir-fry of beef and bok choy, and vegetarian spaghetti, were on the menu when the See Dai Doo Society presented a cooking demonstration at its social hall on Sept. 18. (The recipe for kau yuk follows.)

I had been hearing about the event for months during Mandarin classes, where everyone was especially enthusiastic about biting into the ip jai, or steamed mochi dumplings, which few people make these days, save for special occasions.

Ip jai filled with black sugar. Below is a more savory version of the steamed mochi dumplings, filled with a mixture of ham, mushrooms, dried shrimp and water chestnuts.


Charlene Chang led the demos for the ip jai and kau yuk (pot roast pork), before the men took over the burners to round out the feast to come. Bixby Ho showed how to make easy vegetarian pasta, while See Dai Doo president Wesley Fong, with the help of daughter Cecilia, showed how to make a simple stir-fry of flank steak and bok choy.

He offered up one of the Chinese secrets for tenderizing meat, which is to soak it in water with a little baking soda and massage it for 5 minutes.

He said, "The reason I cook is because I was told all good Chinese husbands cook."

See Dai Doo Society president Wesley Fong, with daughter Cecilia, takes a hands-on approach to leadership. He prepared an East-West stir-fry of flank steak and bok choy. People kidded him later, "What was West?" because beef and bok choy are both eaten by Chinese.

Fong's finished dish.

My father cooked, even if his idea of cooking meant getting an assist from Hamburger Helper.

That we were all there to enjoy the event is the result of the foresight of forebears more than a century ago. The society was founded by 18 men, immigrants from the See Doo (Sidu) and Dai Doo (Dadu) districts of Zhongshan county in Guangdong, on May 10, 1905.

As a matter of survival and mutual support in overseas communities that did not always welcome them, clan groups formed to provide banking and loan services, secure housing, host social events and invest for the future.

In 1910, See Dai Doo members contributed what was then a fortune, $5,000, for the purchase of the Wong Siu Kin School building at 285 N. Vineyard St. to serve as the group's headquarters. Today, rentals provide income that allows the society to function, and public events such as the cooking demo are their way of preserving their heritage and giving back to the community.

When the demos were pau, it was time to eat. The demos represent a two-day commitment, because food prep to feed the crowd took place a day ahead.

Someone brought sliced sugar cane for dessert and for the taking. It was so good and sweet. Not like the dried out canes often inserted into tourist cocktails. I grew up in Waipahu, so we were very familiar with sugar cane.

It all starts with pork belly.

Recipe courtesy Charlene Chang

1-1/2 pounds pork belly, cut into approximately 2-inch-by-3/4-inch slices
1 half Chinese taro, cut into 2-inch-by-1/2-inch slices
1/2 bottle red nam yi (red fermented bean curd
1/2 bottle white nam yi
Oyster sauce, to taste
Brown sugar, to taste
1/4 cup whiskey or cooking wine
Scallion and cilantro (Chinese parsley) stems

In a bowl, mix red and white nam yi, brown sugar, oyster sauce and cooking wine. Set aside. Sprinkle a little sugar on the pot belly. In a skillet, brown the pork belly on all sides on medium heat.

Arrange alternating slices of pork belly (skin side down) and taro in a large bowl. Pour the wet ingredients on top of the pork belly and taro. Layer scallion and cilantro stems on top of arrangement.

Place in hot steamer; steam at least 1-1/2 hours. Allow kau yuk to sit in the pot for another 1/2 hour.

Lift the bowl out of the steamer and pour the sauce out. Place a platter or plate on top of the bowl. Turn the bowl over so the skin side up is facing up and ready to serve.

Pork belly and taro are arranged in alternating slices before sauce is added and it all goes into a steamer.

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Make way for more malasadas

September 8th, 2016


Pipeline Bakery & Creamery offers one more spot to shop for office goodies in the morning. Gayla Young's malasadas, scones and cake bombs have been an instant hit with pastry lovers.

Have malasadas become a thing? These humble Portuguese confections are popping up in more places these days, having found their way onto the upscale menus of the newly open Stripsteak and Eating House 1849 menus, and they are among the treats baked up by Gayla Young and her crew over at Pipeline Bakeshop & Creamery in Kaimuki. After a soft opening period, the new bakery and ice cream shop held its blessing ceremony this morning, in advance of its public grand opening at 6 p.m. today.

Young said she spent a year perfecting her malasada recipe, and its texture fresh out of the oil is amazing, with a crisp shell and airy, pillowy, and slightly salty, center.

Young received a State Senate proclamation from legislator Calvin Say, recognizing Pipeline's opening day.

Pipeline features a lineup of treats baked from scratch, such as blueberry cream cheese and cherry cream cheese scones ($3.50 each), wicked triple chocolate brownies ($3.25 each) and cake bombs ($3.25 each) in flavors such as blueberry, lemon, matcha green tea, chocolate hazelnut and coconut. Back at the office, people who claimed not to like coconut, loved the coconut bomb.

A tray full of cherry cream cheese scones.

Classic white sugar-coated malasadas are $1. Add 10 cents more for li hing sugar, add 20 cents for cocoa, and add 30 cents for coffee flavor.

During grand opening weekend, there will be giveaways, contests and specials. Grand opening hours are 6 to 9 p.m. today, and specials such as $2 scoops of housemade ice cream will run 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 9 to 11.

Pipeline Bakery & Cafe is at 3632 Waialae Ave. (across from Coffee Talk). Call 738-8200.

Kimo Kahoano performed an oli before this morning's blessing.

Kimo Kahoano performed an oli before this morning's blessing.

Kahu Kelekona Bishaw blesses the hands of all employed by Pipeline.

Inside the shop.

Energy bars are $1.95 each.

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Matsumoto Shave Ice turns 65

August 24th, 2016


A visitor is mesmerized by the glory of Matsumoto Shave Ice.

Matsumoto Shave Ice will be celebrating 65 years of serving Hawaii at Hale‘iwa Store Lots, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 27. The event will feature shave ice specials and an opportunity to purchase exclusive Matsumoto Shave Ice T-shirts commemorating the occasion.

In honor of its 65th year of business, Matsumoto Shave Ice will be offering one flavor shave ice for 65 cents, from 9 a.m. until noon. There will also be 500 special print anniversary T-shirts available for purchase at $6.50 per shirt while supplies last. Guest artist DJ Shift will provide entertainment from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., followed by Mike Izon from 2 to 4 p.m.

“Matsumoto Shave Ice is an iconic North Shore destination and we are thrilled to celebrate their 65th Anniversary,” said Ryan Ng, Senior Asset Manager for landlord Kamehameha Schools. “Their 65 years of being in operations is a true testament to the spirit of Hawaii’s homegrown business.”

Selling rainbows and happiness in a bowl.

Established in 1951 by Mamoru Matsumoto and his wife Helen, Matsumoto Shave Ice has been familiar Haleiwa landmark for more than half a century. Matsumoto aimed to open his own business and when an opportunity to open a grocery store arose, he took it, originally taking orders and delivering goods on a bicycle, while Helen, a seamstress, managed the store. After the birth of their three children, the couple decided to expand the business to support their growing family.

Given the store’s beachy North Shore location, Matsumoto began selling shave ice made with homemade syrup. The store’s reputation grew as surfers, weekenders circling the island, and visitors from abroad, dropped in to sample the multiple flavors of Matsumoto’s Shave Ice.

The business remains in family hands, currently owned by one of Mamoru's sons, Stanley Matsumoto.

“We are very excited to be celebrating 65 years in business,” he said, in a press statement. "I am proud to be a part of the legacy that my parents started 65 years ago and I plan to continue this legacy for years to come.”

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Pastries hot out of the oven

July 1st, 2016


Neko pan is one of the delightful new pastry selections at the new BRUG Bakery at Ala Moana Center.

Pastry lovers can get more than their share of daily bread now that BRUG Bakery and Kai Coffee have opened new locations.

First up, since the closing of the Shirokiya store on the Diamond Head end of Ala Moana Center, BRUG is now a solo act, moving into the lower level mauka side of the center between Lupicia and the Sanrio store.

It opened its doors June 25, offering a range of sweet and savory options, including fruit danishes, ratatouille cake, sausage rolls and adorable neko pan, complete with bread tails.

The bakery also has plans to open at Pearlridge in November, followed by the addition of a downtown branch.
BRUG Bakery is on the mauka side street level of Ala Moana Center, next to Lupicia. Open 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Saturdays, and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays. Call 945-2200 or visit

The Japanese name for this pastry translates as "North Country," in honor of BRUG's Hokkaido roots. The foccaccia is topped with fresh local produce that BRUG Bakery Hawaii president Miho Choi said is evocative of the fresh produce Hokkaido is also known for.



Bing cherry and honey ricotta soustenir from Kai Coffee.

Bing cherry and honey ricotta soustenir from Kai Coffee.

Once downtown, the bakery will find company. On the same day of Brug's opening, Kai Coffee opened the doors to its second location in downtown Honolulu's Arcade Building.

In addition to serving craft-brewed coffees ranging from cortados to lattes, the new café also marks the debut of a menu featuring Kai Coffee's own in-house baked goods, which produces dozens of savory and sweet pastries.

In addition to cafe basics such as croissants, scones and cakes, those hungry for a quick breakfast or lunch bite will find items such as banana bread and soustenirs—ciabatta and focaccia breads baked with toppings such as pastrami and onion, Black Forest ham and cheddar cheese, or baked fruit. A few salads and stew selections will round out the menu.

A sampling of peanut butter, honey and chocolate croissants.

Responsible for producing all these baked goods is Antonio Domingo who spent 26 years as executive pastry chef at the Hawaii Prince Hotel, while simultaneously working as a pastry chef at the Hilton Hawaiian Village 24 years, learning on the job after moving here from the Philippines.

"I always liked cooking and baking," he said, knowing it was unusual in the macho culture of the Philippines for a little boy to prefer helping his mom in the kitchen than playing outside.

Coffee love, inside the new Kai Coffee in downtown Honolulu.

Samples of Domingo's work were in abundance during a grand opening celebration ahead June 24, where it looked like a wedding day when local founders Samuel and Natalie Suiter cut into a congratulatory cake baked for the occasion. Only this time, it wasn't Natalie who got splattered by cake. Frosting flew around the room as Sam hacked away, saying, "I always wanted to do that."

Sam and Natalier Suiter made the grand opening celebration look like a wedding day as they cut the celebratory cake.

The couple opened the first Kai Coffee in the Hyatt Regency Waikiki Beach Resort & Spa two years ago to showcase the best Hawaii regional and international coffee.

Now with its own in-house bakery, what started as a coffee bar is well on it's way to becoming a full-fledged dining café.
Kai Coffee's new location, at 207 S. King St., will be open from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays to Fridays. Call 537-3415 or visit

A view of Kai Coffee from the street.

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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