Archive for January, 2015

Eat Local Tuesdays at Foodland

By
January 22nd, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAya Nishihara and Eric Newhouse have fun with props during the launch of Eat Local Tuesdays at Foodland Aina Haina.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Aya Nishihara and Eric Newhouse have fun with props during the launch of Eat Local Tuesdays at Foodland Aina Haina.

Foodland launched its new weekly Eat Local Tuesdays program Jan. 20, with all Foodland Hawaii locations supporting the idea of buying local in support of farmers and a safe, sustainable food supply for Hawaii.

They will be making local products easier to find, tagging them with orange "locally grown" and "locally made" signs, and sharing samples from 3 to 6 p.m. or 4 to 7 p.m. depending on the store. Students from neighboring high schools will be offering free samples to customers, their participation made possible through a "Buy Local It Matters" Eat Local 2015 grant from the State Department of Agriculture.

The ultimate goal, said Jenai Wall, chairman and CEO of Foodland, is to motivate customers to eat local once a week.

"We realize that for most consumers, just a small part of their budget goes to locally produced food. Most of their money is spent on imported items. Eat Local Tuesdays is our way to rally the community to support local producers," she said.

The concept for the weekly program references Kanu Hawaii's annual Eat Local Challenge, which calls on the community to eat locally produced food exclusively for a month. But Wall makes the point that committing to such a long challenge might intimidate a great many eaters.

"It might have people unsure whether they can commit," she said. "If you ask for one day a week, you might be able to get all of us to do it."

Because local products often come from small producers, prices tend to be higher. But Wall said Foodland has reduced prices on all local items. These are flagged with orange price signs so shoppers can walk down aisles and easily spot Hawaii products, which are now included in every department.

Kalani High School juniors Christina Shin, left, and Victoria Huynh were there to offer samples of meatloaf made with the Local Item of the Week, local ground beef, that this week was priced at $5.49 per pound with Maka'i Card.

Kalani High School juniors Christina Shin, left, and Victoria Huynh were there to offer samples of meatloaf made with the Local Item of the Week, local ground beef, that this week was priced at $5.49 per pound with Maika'i Card.

Now here's something I didn't know, the River of Life Mission has its own chocolate-making enterprise, Chocolate on a Mission, to help raise funds for its support services. Learn more at chocolateonamission.com

Now here's something I didn't know, the River of Life Mission has its own chocolate-making enterprise, Chocolate on a Mission, to help raise funds for its support services. Learn more at http://chocolateonamission.com.

Also offering chocolate was Amy Hammond of Aloha Chocolate Co., whose tins feature locally themed chocolates incorporating Waialua Estate Chocolate, and below, chocolate shaped like coffee beans.

Also offering chocolate was Amy Hammond of Aloha Chocolate Co., whose tins feature locally themed chocolates incorporating Waialua Estate Chocolate, and below, chocolate shaped like coffee beans.

Tasty bean

p align="left">More local sweets came in the form of macadamia nut and vanilla nougat made with local ingredients, shared by Christian Acerogiles. The roasted macadamia nuts were so pure and intense.

More local sweets came in the form of macadamia nut and vanilla nougat made with local ingredients, shared by Christian Acerogiles. The roasted macadamia nuts were so pure and intense.

During the launch, Foodland Aina Haina welcomed a sizable neighbor island contingent of farmers and food producers, including beautiful Maui Fruit Jewels inspired by French patés de fruits, fresh fruit purees cooked with pectin to create a concentrated jammy jewel candy.

During the launch, Foodland Aina Haina welcomed a sizable neighbor island contingent of farmers and food producers, including beautiful Maui Fruit Jewels inspired by French patés de fruits, fresh fruit purees cooked with pectin to create a concentrated jammy jewel candy.

Stacy Au and Jan Tsue, left, came from the Big Island to represent Na'alehu's Paradise Meadows Orchard and Bee Farm, whose products include Hawaii's Local Buzz honey, macadamia nuts and coffee. Tsue told an amazing story of her aunt and uncle coming to Hawaii for peace and quiet, buying some land, and after clearing it, discovering they had a farm with lime and lemon trees, macadamia nuts and coffee.

Stacy Au and Jan Tsue, left, came from the Big Island to represent Na'alehu's Paradise Meadows Orchard and Bee Farm, whose products include Hawaii's Local Buzz honey, macadamia nuts and coffee. Tsue told an amazing story of her aunt and uncle coming to Hawaii for peace and quiet, buying some land, and after clearing it, discovering they had a farm with lime and lemon trees, macadamia nuts and coffee.

A sampling of Paradise Meadows garlic roasted- and chocolate-covered macadamia nuts.

A sampling of Paradise Meadows garlic roasted- and chocolate-covered macadamia nuts.

Kokohead Foods smoked ahi spread was the hit of the afternoon, a product of Kaimuki's 12th Ave Grill.

Kokohead Foods smoked ahi spread was the hit of the afternoon, a product of Kaimuki's 12th Ave Grill.

p align="left">Naked Cow Dairy's Sabrina St. Martin was there to share new products, including honey- and Kona coffee-rubbed Kona Buzz cheese, and Pink Hawaii cheese studded with crushed pink peppercorns. Coming up will be a squid-ink brie.

Naked Cow Dairy's Sabrina St. Martin was there to share new products, including honey- and Kona coffee-rubbed Kona Buzz cheese, and Pink Hawaii cheese studded with crushed pink peppercorns. Coming up will be a squid-ink brie.

Maui Pasta Co. offered crostini with artichoke heart dip, spinach linguini with tomato cream sauce and pesto lasagna.

Maui Pasta Co. offered crostini with artichoke heart dip, spinach linguini with tomato cream sauce and pesto lasagna.

 Lomi poke was the week's seafood special, at $10.99 per pound with Maika'i Card.

Lomi poke was Tuesday's seafood special, at $10.99 per pound with Maika'i Card.

This Hawaiian plate was the week's local deli special.

This Hawaiian plate was the week's local deli special.

Many of love the combination of sweet and spicy offered in Ohelo's Four Pepper Jelly.

Many of love the combination of sweet and spicy offered in Ohelo's Four Pepper Jelly.

Foodland's seafood salad was being served on beds of aquaponic lettuce from Mari's Gardens.

Foodland's seafood salad was being served on beds of aquaponic lettuce from Mari's Gardens.

Foodland invites customers to take the Eat Local Tuesdays pledge at checkout or online at Foodland.com and commit to eating local at least one day a week.

Customers who take the pledge will receive double Maika'i points on the local items they purchase on Tuesdays. In addition, each week there will be a Local Item of the Week offered at a reduced price. You can also sign up to receive weekly notice of the item, as well as recipes and information about the producer.

Also, on Tuesdays only, there will be a specially priced local deli offering and seafood poke offering. This week's items were a Hawaiian plate lunch of laulau, hulihuli chicken, lomi salmon and pineapple, for $8.99, and a lomi poke bowl of ahi tossed with lomi salmon and sea asparagus, for $10.99.

Jan. 27's Item of the Week is Love's Sweet Bread, at $3.99 when purchased with Maika'i Card, and there will be sampling of Hawaiian Sun Fruit Jams and Jellies, Big Island navel oranges, and Kauai's Anahola Granola.

For updates, follow @foodlandhi on Instagram and Twitter, and FoodlandHawaii on Facebook, and use the hashtag #EatLocalTuesdays.

———

Honolulu Star-Advertiser Food Editor Joleen Oshiro contributed to this report.

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Enjoying the Sony Open's other half

By
January 21st, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAmong menu choices at the Halekulani Sky Box at Sony Open in Hawaii: poke with taro chips, kung pao chicken lettuce wraps and teriyaki beef skewers prepared by staffers at Waialae Country Club.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Among menu choices at the Halekulani Sky Box at Sony Open in Hawaii: poke with taro chips, kung pao chicken lettuce wraps and teriyaki beef skewers prepared by staffers at Waialae Country Club.

For about a decade, a friend of mine kept inviting me to join her in one of the skyboxes at Sony Open in Hawaii. My thinking was, "What could be more boring than watching a game of golf?"

She was like, "Oh no. It's a party and you just eat and drink. You don't have to be a fan of golf at all."

I had my doubts, but about three years ago, I finally agreed to go ... and had a blast! I had invitations to a trio of skyboxes with vantages over the 18th hole at Waialae Country Club, but I knew other people in charge of admission to the boxes, so we hopped from one to the next to compare notes on just what was on the table, though all food is prepared by the country club culinary staff.

I even got into the excitement of the game, oohing and awwing at appropriate ball drops and misses, in between bites and sips, of course.

This year, I arrived late in the afternoon Jan. 16, when food was running low, but here's a peek at the other half of the Sony Open that you don't see covered in the sports pages, or this year, crime reports.

Cocktail shrimp in the Halekulani Skybox.

Cocktail shrimp in the Halekulani Skybox.

More teriyaki beef sticks.

More teriyaki beef sticks.

Crispy wontons.

Crispy wontons.

Those without a Skybox invitation could nosh on game-day fare of hot dogs and nachos.

Those without a Skybox invitation could nosh on game-day fare of hot dogs and nachos.

COURTESY PHOTOS BY REINE AH MOOInside sponsor Sony's tent, the sushi bar is an annual hit, as is Japanese curry and bacon-wrapped scallops.

COURTESY PHOTOS BY REINE AH MOO

Inside sponsor Sony's tent, the sushi bar is an annual hit, as is Japanese curry and bacon-wrapped scallops.

Other food prepared by the Waialae Country Club staff includes chicken katsu and BBQ pork ribs.

Other food prepared by the Waialae Country Club staff includes chicken katsu and BBQ pork ribs.

The welcome color of fresh fruit and veggies.

The welcome color of fresh fruit and veggies.

Sony carving station with roast strip loin.

Sony carving station with roast strip loin.

And a salad.

And a salad.

For more from the Sony Open, check out the video below.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

Ménard guest stars in La Mer kitchen

By
January 21st, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comHalekulani executive chef Vikram Garg and visiting chef Bruno Menard share a laugh in the kitchen before service begins.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Halekulani executive chef Vikram Garg and visiting chef Bruno Ménard share a laugh in the kitchen before service begins.

During a special dinner at Halekulani's La Mer restaurant Sunday night, guest chef Bruno Ménard gave diners a taste of the work of a three-star Michelin chef, one of the most prestigious designations in the culinary world.

In the kitchen before guests arrived, Ménard prepped the staff on the ins and outs of each dish and exacting details of service, including just a small pour of red wine and truffle Perigueux sauce that would accompany a filet of beef tenderloin prepared in the style of venison.

"And we should leave the extra sauce on the table?" one waiter asked hopefully, knowing that Hawaii diners love a good sauce.

A sharp "No!" was Ménard's response, feeling the beef would stand on its own.

And so went the dinner, complex but spare, using the finest ingredients requested by the chef, with some local ingredients — such as Maui onions and Kona lobster — swapped for their French counterparts. Flavors were clear, clean and crisp, with dishes balanced throughout, every ingredient accounted for on the plate and nothing extraneous.

Each dish was paired with wine from Young's Market Co., selected by Master Sommelier Patrick Okubo.

A beautiful sunset to start the evening.

A beautiful sunset to start the evening.

Amuse of leek purée, tomato gelée and olive oil ice cream, with pickled tomato and pineapple. Essentially a beautiful light salad in a martini glass.

Amuse of leek purée, tomato gelée and olive oil ice cream, with pickled tomato and pineapple. Essentially a beautiful light salad in a martini glass.

Kona lobster Parisienne blanketed by tomato-hibiscus gelée, with vanilla chutney and dots of crustacean oil. Topped with handpicked local vegetables. Accompanied by Louis Jadot, Corton-Charlemagne, Grand Cru 2012.

Kona lobster Parisienne blanketed by tomato-hibiscus gelée, with vanilla chutney and dots of crustacean oil. Topped with handpicked local vegetables. Accompanied by Louis Jadot, Corton-Charlemagne, Grand Cru 2012.

Delicate and billowy Maui onion soup over truffle custard royale studded with peas, fava beans and yuzu skin confit. Served with Charles Heidsieck, Blanc des Millénaires, Brut 1995.

Delicate and billowy Maui onion soup over truffle custard royale studded with peas, fava beans and yuzu skin confit. Served with Charles Heidsieck, Blanc des Millénaires, Brut 1995.

Coquilles Saint Jacques Pôelées with Parmesan gnocchi, sake-scented cream, måche couilis and brown butter, served with Domaine Long-Depaquit, Chablis Vaudésir, Grand Cru 2009.

Coquilles Saint Jacques Pôelées with Parmesan gnocchi, sake-scented cream, måche couilis and brown butter, served with Domaine Long-Depaquit, Chablis Vaudésir, Grand Cru 2009.

Beef tenderloin prepared venison-style, with savoy cabbage, light potato and foie gras cannelloni, and truffle and red wine Périgueux sauce. Topped with a line of salt, pepper and roasted soba tea. Accompanied by Château Rauzan-Segla, Margaux 2008 and Domaine du Clos Frantin, Vosne Romanée Les Malconsorts, 1er Cru 2012.

Beef tenderloin prepared venison-style, with savoy cabbage, light potato and foie gras cannelloni, and truffle and red wine Périgueux sauce. Topped with a line of salt, pepper and roasted soba tea. Accompanied by Château Rauzan-Segla, Margaux 2008 and Domaine du Clos Frantin, Vosne Romanée Les Malconsorts, 1er Cru 2012.

Valrhona P125 chocolate macaron soufflé with vanilla sorbet and caramelia pearls. Accompanied by Domaine La Tour Vielle, Banyuls Rimage 2013.

Valrhona P125 chocolate macaron soufflé with vanilla sorbet and caramelia pearls. Accompanied by Domaine La Tour Vielle, Banyuls Rimage 2013.

At the end of the meal, the chef asked me which was my favorite dish, which was hard to say. My first thought was of the lobster Parisienne layered over beautiful tomato and hibiscus gelée. But the Maui onion soup over truffle custard royale with textured surprises of fresh sweet peas, fava beans and yuzu skin confit hidden within, was heavenly. I couldn't help but note the classic French dish is similar in concept to Japanese chawanmushi, which the chef might have also noted during his time at L'Osier in Tokyo, where he earned the Michelin stars.

I also loved the lightness of the non-pasta cabbage, potato, foie gras and black truffle canneloni.

At the end of the meal, many a guest, who had paid $295 per person, asked, "When's the next dinner?"

The idea is planted, so time will tell.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

Outstanding in the Field returns

By
January 14th, 2015



PHOTO BY ILANA FREDDYE / Outstanding in the FieldOutstanding in the Field, the traveling table-to-farm troupe, is returning to Hawaii this month for two dinners set between soil and sky.

COURTESY ILANA FREDDYE

Outstanding in the Field, the traveling table-to-farm troupe, is returning to Hawaii this month for two dinners set between soil and sky.

Outstanding in the Field returns with its roving restaurant without walls concept to host two table-to-farm feasts in Hawaii.

The events will take place:

» 3 p.m. Jan. 25 at Kualoa Ranch, with guest chef Mark Noguchi. Cost is $210.

» 3 p.m. Jan. 28 at Mauna Kea Tea Farm, on the slopes of Mauna Kea on the Big Island, with guest chef Bonita Lao. Cost is $190.

PHOTO BY JIM DENEVAN / outstanding in the fieldPast event at Ma'o Farms.

COURTESY JIM DENEVAN

Past event at MA'O Farms.

Outstanding in the Field was born in the summer of 1999, when Jim Denevan came up with the idea of inviting guests to an open-air meal celebrating the farmer and the gifts of the land at a communal table.

Since then, Outstanding in the Field has staged table-to-farm dinners in all 50 states and nine countries around the world, welcoming more than 80,000 people to its long table set in farm fields and orchards, on beaches and mountaintops, in barns and greenhouses, with the help of more than 100 chefs, including dozens of James Beard award winners and nominees.

After a tour of the farm — in this case the setting for "Jurassic Park" and summer's "Jurassic World," as well as a tea farm — diners take their seats alongside the farmers and local food artisans who have provided ingredients for the feast to talk story about their work and their passion.

For more information, visit outstandinginthefield.com.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Buying local matters to teen chefs

By
January 13th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comKrislyn Miyagawa, a Mid-Pac junior, won the Best Cookoff Performance award for her dish of seared opah and scallops over local veggies, during the statewide "Buy Local, It Matters" student recipe and cooking contest. SSurrounding her are, from left, judges Pamela Young, Sheraton Waikiki chef Darren Demaya, Dean of the UHM College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Maria Gallo, and Sharon Hurd from the Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Krislyn Miyagawa, a Mid-Pac junior, won the Best Cookoff Performance award for her dish of seared opah and scallops over local veggies, during the statewide "Buy Local, It Matters" student recipe and cooking contest. Surrounding her are, from left, judges Pamela Young, Sheraton Waikiki chef Darren Demaya, Dean of the UHM College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Maria Gallo, and Sharon Hurd from the Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

If you want evidence as to how far we've come on the culinary front, you just need to take a look at the professional level work presented by high school students who participated in the "Buy Local, It Matters" statewide recipe and cooking contest.

Molokai High School senior Kiana Simmons works on her dish of round steak roulade with bacon, Kumu Farms pesto and Molokai sweet potato mash. She brought her homegrown products with her.

Molokai High School senior Kiana Simmons works on her dish of round steak roulade with bacon, Kumu Farms pesto and Molokai sweet potato mash. She brought her homegrown products with her.

The event, sponsored by the Hawaii State Department of Agriculture, took place in the commercial kitchen at the University of Hawaii at Manoa Ag Science building Dec. 5, with five finalists hailing from Kea'au High on the Big Island, Molokai High, Campbell and Mid-Pacific Institute.

The students got there by first submitting a 200- to 300-word essay explaining what buying local meant to themselves, their family, community and Hawaii. They also had to submit a recipe that included at least two locally grown or produced food items. More than 65 students entered the contest.

The state's "Buy Local" campaign was launched in 2007. According to Gail Hurd from the Hawaii State Department of Agriculture, and one of the judges for the competition, sustainability education is important if we are to support local industry and produce. She said that although .4 percent of the state's budget is dedicated to agriculture, Waikiki hotels buy 70 percent of local ingredients available "because tourists want that experience," she said, while lamenting the loss of such local produce as yellow-skinned, pink-fesh guavas that once grew on Kauai but can no longer be found.

In getting the students to think about what we lose when we rely on imports, she said the importance of buying local goes back into their communities.

For the neighbor island students, agriculture is a subject close to home. Kea'au High School senior Kenny Nguyen's father farms ginger and potatoes, and he's well acquainted with Big Island grown Hamakua mushrooms and Kona blue shrimp that went into his siu mai.

Mid-Pac junior Krislyn Miyagawa's winning dish of seared opah and scallops over local veggies.

Mid-Pac junior Krislyn Miyagawa's winning dish of seared opah and scallops over local veggies.

The two neighbor island contestants, Molokai High School senior Kiana Simmons and Kea'au senior Kenny Nguyen, shared the Best Winning Recipe award. Sheraton Waikiki chef Darren Demaya will be putting their dishes on the Kai Market menu.

The two neighbor island contestants, Molokai High School senior Kiana Simmons and Kea'au senior Kenny Nguyen, shared the Best Winning Recipe award. Sheraton Waikiki chef Darren Demaya will be putting their dishes on the Kai Market menu.

Kiana's finished dish.

Kiana's finished dish.

A closeup of the dish.

A closeup of the dish.

Kenny with his finished dish of Hamakua mushroom and Kona blue shrimp siu mai.

Kenny with his finished dish of Hamakua mushroom and Kona blue shrimp siu mai.

Molokai high school senior Kiana Simmons also brought her own Molokai beef and sweet potatoes with her, rather than asking for Dept. of Ag assistance.

Some of the mushrooms that went into Kenny's dish.

Some of the mushrooms that went into Kenny's dish.

Keisha  Cheung, a junior at shows her baked tai fillet sprinkled with li hing powder and served with taro pineapple purée and wilted watercress.

Keisha Cheung, a junior at Campbell High School, shows her baked tai fillet sprinkled with li hing powder and served with taro pineapple purée and wilted watercress.

Campbell senior Ciara Batulan presented a chicken-filled tart with mango-pineapple chutney.

Campbell senior Ciara Batulan presented a chicken-filled tart with mango-pineapple chutney.

There was a lot of pressure on the students in a room filled with onlookers, parents, judges and photographers.

There was a lot of pressure on the students in a room filled with onlookers, parents, judges, photographers and videographers.

As to where they're learning to cook and plate like a master chef, Mid-Pac junior Krislyn Miyagawa said she's self-taught from watching YouTube videos for a year-and-a-half.

"I'm an active person and play tennis, so I'm into eating healthier and cooking healthier, so that was the spark for wanting to cook," she said, adding that adults often warn, "If you don't take care of your body now you'll pay for it later."

"I don't eat out a lot because I'm able to cook by looking at pictures in magazines and videos on YouTube. I learn from them but make it my own."

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives